FAQs for Teachers

Take a look at our online information session from November 6, 2013. We covered the basics of Ocean 180 and some guidance on how to get involved. If you have additional questions about Ocean 180 or were unable to attend the webinar, we encourage you to view the video below.
 
 
 
  
 
 
I’m a middle school teacher, how do I sign-up my class to participate in the judging?
To register your class, visit the Ocean 180 website (www.ocean180.org) and complete the online registration form by December 19, 2014. Once we have received all video submissions, our team of Wave 1 judges will narrow the field to the top 10 entries by the end of December 2014. Ballots and instructions on how to access and view the videos online will be distributed to registered classrooms via email by January 2, 2015.
 
 
I teach several different classes throughout the day with different students, can I register all my classes?
Yes!  You can register up to eight (8) classes to participate as judges.  There is no limit to the number of teachers or classes that may participate from the same school.
 
 
Can classes in non-science subjects (e.g., math, literature, technology, arts) participate?
Yes!  There are no restrictions on the types of classes that may participate.
 
 
Several teachers in my school are interested in participating. Can I register them all under my name?
To accurately track the number of teachers participating and to make sure all votes are counted, we ask that each teacher register their own classes, i.e., the classes they teach.  In the event you team-teach a class, only one teacher needs to register.
 
 
Are charter schools and home schools eligible to participate?
Absolutely! As long as your students are in 6th-8th grade, your classroom is eligible to participate. Virtual classrooms and schools are also welcome to participate.
 
 
Are students outside the US eligible to participate? Do the student judges have to be US citizens?
Middle school students from all nationalities in classrooms anywhere in the world are eligible to participate as Ocean 180 judges. 
 
 
Can students register on their own?
Students cannot register themselves. They must participate as part of a registered class.
 
 
Can students vote individually?
Students cannot vote individually. They must vote as part of a registered class.  We request that teachers and classes use the rubric available on the Ocean 180 website to evaluate the videos (rubric available here). While individual students may evaluate each of the finalists, each class is only allowed to select their top three videos.
 
 
Does my class need to watch all 10 videos in a row?
No.  Your class will have from January 2-February 27, 2015 to watch the videos and select their favorite three entries. This should give you some flexibility when scheduling times for the students to view and vote on the videos.  However, we do request that students watch the videos together in class (not for homework) and that you permit your students to watch all 10 videos before voting. 
 
 
We also encourage you randomize the order in which the students watch the videos and to use the Ocean 180 rubric (available at http://ocean180.org/images/banners/PDF/Student%20Judging%20Rubric_2015_Final.pdf) to guide the students’ evaluation of the videos. 
 
 
How much instructional time will it take for my class to watch the videos?
Each video is only 3 minutes long – making the total viewing time only 30 min. However, we’re sure the videos will stimulate a lot of discussion, so you will want to budget some additional time.
 
 
Where can I get the videos and will I be able to view them before showing them to my class?
The videos will be available online on YouTube (www.youtube.com) and Vimeo (www.vimeo.com).  You will be able to access and watch the videos at any time after January 2, 2015.  You might want to pre-screen the videos before showing them to your class.  If your school’s internet policy and/or firewall prevent you from accessing both sites, there will be an option to download the videos to a DVD or an USB-drive so they can be viewed without access to the web.
 
 
What criteria will the students use to evaluate the video abstracts?
One goal of Ocean 180 is to encourage scientists to practice their communication skills by sharing their discoveries and excitement for research with students and the general public.  Therefore, we ask students to assess how well the videos effectively communicate research findings. Teachers are encouraged (but not required) to use the student rubric (Appendix II) to guide the evaluation and selection of the top three videos for each class.
 
 
What are the responsibilities of teachers participating in Ocean 180?
Teachers registering with the Ocean 180 Video Challenge are expected to 1) show all 10 video finalists in their registered classrooms, 2) encourage students to vote for those videos which best communicate the message, findings, and importance of the research, 3) compile student votes and comments, and 4) submit final ballots for each classroom via our online form.
 
 
How will I submit the class’ votes?
All registered classes will receive a voting packet on January 2, 2015 with complete instructions on how to access and view the videos online.  Votes will be submitted via an online form available on the Ocean 180 website. After registering, you will be sent more detailed instructions on the voting process.
 
 
How many votes do my students get?
Each classroom will get three (3) ballots/votes and each teacher may register up to 8 (eight) classrooms.
 
 
Will the video abstracts be available for viewing after the Challenge is over?
The top 10 video abstracts from each annual competition will continue to be available on the Ocean 180 website (www.Ocean180.org). You are welcome to use any of the videos posted online and we encourage you to view previous finalists and winners.
 

By the Numbers

37,795 students in 50 US states, the US Virgin Islands, and 21 countries participated as judges in the 2015 Ocean 180 Video Challenge.

Ocean 180 Newsletter

Questions?

Email: info@ocean180.org